Archives for Health Matters Blog

Why Not All Mental Health Problems Are Psychological

Minding the Body Means More Than Just Taking a Pill Even though we recognize that physiological processes hugely influence cognition, emotion, and behavior, too many therapists still tend to practice as if treatment should focus entirely on the mind, says functional medicine psychiatrist Robert Hedaya. There’s a need to analyze the body as well as practice traditional psychotherapy, he says. “Learn to keep your ears open to nutritional, bodily, or energy complaints,” he explains. “Therapists can do a tremendous amount if they just expand their thinking.” In the following interview with Networker Editor Rich Simon, Hedaya explains how therapists can
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Categories: Health Matters Blog and Interviews with Dr. Hedaya.

Hope and Healing Research

Excellent ‘recipe’ book for how to understand how hope can heals us. Dr. Hedaya was recently interviewed by the Integrative Medicine Clinician’s Journal. He was asked about the role of hope in the healing process.  This is his response: “Hope is critical in all healing. A book written by Jerome Frank Persuasion and Healing, deals with this topic very effectively. Hopelessness is one of the cardinal features of depression (as is helplessness). Hope and depression are inversely correlated. Hope assists healing and can in and of itself cause healing, but there are many situations (e.g., pernicious anemia leading to panic and depression)
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Categories: Articles & White Papers and Health Matters Blog.

Five Herbs Plus Thiamine Reduce Pain and Improve Functional Mobility in Patients With Pain

by Robert Hedaya,  MD, DLFAPA ABSTRACT Context • Five herbs—Urtica dioica (stinging nettle), Boswellia serrata, Equisetum arvense, Allium sativum, and Apium graveolens—have been demonstrated to have activity at several anti-inflammatory pathways and have analgesic properties that are effective in treating chronic musculoskeletal pain. Objectives • The study intended to evaluate the clinical efficacy of a proprietary blend of U dioica, B serrata, E arvense, A sativum, A graveolens, and thiamine (vitamin B1), or “the blend,” in the treatment of chronic musculoskeletal pain. Methods • The research team performed a prospective case study. Setting • The study took place at the National
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Categories: Articles & White Papers and Health Matters Blog.

Suicide: Overlooked Causes You Should Know

I would like to talk with you about a current but very difficult topic…suicide. Statistics show a clear rise in suicide frequency with the highest risk being in white middle-aged males. In my nearly 40-year career, I have treated countless people who have felt suicidal to varying degrees. I have been able to prevent suicide in all cases, largely because I work hard to understand the nature of their depression and anxiety, I connect intensively to my patients, I remain in close contact, I have a very high sensitivity to suicide risk factors, and I use lithium and or hospitalization
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Categories: Articles & White Papers, Health Matters Blog, and Whole Psychiatry in the News.

Dr. Hedaya looks familiar to many

If Dr. Hedaya looks familiar to you, it may be because you’ve seen his uncle, the actor, Dan Hedaya. Dan Hedaya is known for his prolific career in film and television as well as his artwork. Creativity runs in the family – Dr. Hedaya is gifted photographer and guitarist.  Part of a large Brooklyn family, both Hedaya men share a deep love of family, music, art and baseball.  Though they have left Brooklyn, they remain loyal Yankee fans.
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Categories: Health Matters Blog, News, and Whole Psychiatry in the News.

Bipolar Disorder and Seasonal Affective Disorder A Clinical Illustration: “Bill”

Bill is a 27-year-old physicist with bipolar SAD, type A. He agreed to take lithium, which eliminated his springtime hypomania, but only partially alleviated his winter depression. Light therapy was added with good results. After three years, Bill married, and two years later he and his wife decided to move to a farm, which is at the same latitude, essentially, as his home of origin (the frequency of SAD goes down as one moves toward the equator and sunlight increases, and vice versa). I will never forget the conversation Bill and I had after his second year on the farm,
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Categories: Case Studies and Health Matters Blog.

Depression and Marital Problems A Clinical Illustration – “Jenny”

The Importance of Context and the Limits of Medication Every health care provider has had experiences that were so powerful that they have forever transformed his or her thinking and approach to patients. The following was such a case. It demonstrated a number of things to me, including the importance of context, the limitations of medication, and the failure of psychiatrists – myself included – to educate their nonmedically trained therapist colleagues in the rapidly progressing biological realm. At a time when the secrets of the brain are being unraveled, and research in the brain sciences is burgeoning like few
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Categories: Case Studies and Health Matters Blog.

Journey from Postpartum Depression and Panic Disorder to Wellness

High Functioning Businesswoman When Janine first came to see me she was 35 years old, and had just delivered her third child. As a former businesswoman, her transition to full time mom had been very rocky. One of the first things she said to me was, “I was high functioning until 3 years ago.” I was glad she told me this, for it gave me a baseline sense of who Janine was as a person in this regard. Pregnancy Complications, Depression, and Panic Attack She went on to detail her medical history: “During my pregnancy with my son, my third child, I
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Categories: Case Studies and Health Matters Blog.

Obsessive Compulsive Disorder Treated without Medication – John

Severe OCD since 4th Grade John was a very bright young fellow who was heading off to an Ivy League university in the fall. He was suffering from very severe OCD since 4th grade. He had tried Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, however it didn’t help. He refused exposure and response prevention therapy. Eventually, his OCD became so severe that he refused to extend his elbow because of his belief that such an action would cause harm to someone he loved. He also refused medication. Headaches, GI Problems, and Weight Problems His Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive scores was= 29 (obsessive=12, compulsive=17). He complained
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Categories: Case Studies and Health Matters Blog.