The Link Between Diet, Exercise and Alzheimer’s

A new study finds that lifestyle changes can improve cognition

This article published in The Wall Street Journal is a very important and welcome sign that the discussion around Alzheimer’s disease (AD) as well as many other neurodegenerative disorders is shifting. Alzheimer’s and other forms of dementia are not inevitable, and we do not have to wait around helplessly for the development of medication.

We can take action NOW. I would amplify the measures described in this excellent article by adding an assessment of hormones, and the elimination of inflammatory factors (e.g., infections, gastrointestinal disorders, mold exposures).

I would lean more heavily on interval training, increasing novelty, and emphasize that brain challenges need to be more than casual exercises. As an example, learning a new language is a great idea, but the benefits of a second language come mostly with immersion, and the use of the second language on a daily basis. This allows those with underlying AD to function effectively significantly longer before the underlying disease becomes manifest. So, whatever you do to challenge your brain, make sure there is some degree of discomfort. That’s your signal that you are building more brain connections.

Finally, to get the most out of prevention, especially if you have a family history of dementia or a personal history of brain/head injuries, get personalized laboratory testing done so that you can personalize your program, and monitor your progress.