Posts by Dr. Robert Hedaya

Fractured Families – a good thing?

I was thinking about the high rate of fractured families and the lack of community in the US, when I began to look at the issue from a different perspective. Fractured families may not be pathological from the planet’s point of view. The earth’s limited resources, or at least the way we are using them, cannot sustain the increasing numbers of human inhabitants. These days, it is clear that the tide has changed; we are not living in a time of easy expansion, which has been present for years. We are now at a point where resources are becoming scarce,
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Categories: Health Matters Blog.

PMS and Insomnia: What to do?

Insomnia, an all too common problem, is usually attributed to stress, depression, anxiety, alcohol or caffeine use, poor sleep hygiene, restless legs syndrome, and sleep apnea. Hormonally, thyroid abnormalities, and unusually low levels of melatonin can cause insomnia as well. While all of these syndromes should be considered in evaluating insomnia, the role that PMS and female hormones (progesterone, estrogens) play in insomnia is rarely discussed. Background In healthy women sleep disturbances occur twice as often as they do in men. Insomnia is also often more common in the 1-2 weeks before menstruation begins (the luteal phase of the cycle),
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Categories: Health Matters Blog.

Mitochondria and inflammation

New research indicates that in cases of closed crush injury, runaway inflammation is not due to infection, as previously thought. Never able to find the source of the supposed infection, doctors and researchers were baffled until now. It turns out that when there is such an injury, the mitochondria, which are the energy powerhouses of the body, are released into the circulation. Since mitochondria are thought to be energy producing bacteria-like organisms it’s not surprising that the immune system would mount a response to these usually cell bound parts of us. Mitochondria are not usually present in the blood stream,
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Categories: Health Matters Blog.

5-Day Energy Rebalancing Diet

Most people (except those with liver and kidney disease) do not get enough protein (fish, meat, eggs) for breakfast and lunch. Try increasing your protein at breakfast and lunch for five days and see if you don’t notice a difference in your energy, reduced cravings at night, improved mood, and less of an afternoon slump within five days. I was so impressed by this effect that it was part of the motivation for my second book.
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Categories: Health Matters Blog.

The Effects of Thyroid Function and Mental Health

A recent study known as the Colorado Thyroid Disease Prevalence Study, found that 13 million Americans may have undiagnosed thyroid conditions, and suggested that more widespread thyroid testing is needed. Among their findings are the fact that 9.9 percent of the population had a thyroid abnormality that had gone unrecognized. An underactive thyroid — hypothyroidism — affects more women than men, and the risk increases with age for both men and women. Clearly, there is a need for more widespread thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) testing and more aggressive treatment, especially for subclinical patients. Additionally, another study, called the NHANES study,
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Categories: Health Matters Blog.

Traditional Medicine and You

Yet despite these limitations, if I break my arm, or have an acute illness, I want a really good traditional doc. They do a pretty good job with acute illness. And if I have a chronic illness, I want a really good integrative medicine person. My advice: On a day-to-day basis always be your own doctor-eat well, get enough sleep, exercise, meditate, have fun and build good relationships. When you need to see a health care practitioner you must work hard to be an active and full partner in the process. Learn as much as you can. Investigate, think, and
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Categories: Health Matters Blog.

Medicine Is Trendy and Cyclical

The behavior patterns I have outlined above go far back in time. If you are interested, read “Mad in America”. This 400-year history of the psychiatric establishment demonstrates the financial engine, masked as science, which has driven most developments in the field. Roughly fifty year cycles of new paradigms recur: invention, profit, and disillusion regularly re-cur almost like clockwork. I suspect we are now at the beginning of the next cycle in psychiatry with the loss of confidence in pharmaceuticals (‘a pill for every ill’). Trans-cranial magnetic stimulation, and deep brain stimulation may be the next wave. There is certainly
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Categories: Health Matters Blog.

Evidence Based Medicine Sounds Good, Right?

So where is the problem? First of all chronic illnesses, which are the major focus of our health care system, usually do not occur in isolation. The woman who has heart disease generally has insulin resistance and osteoporosis too. Also, because of advances in the field of genetics, we now know that if you conduct a study on a disease—say heart attacks—and don’t control for the relevant individual genetic differences, then you have a mixed population in which the intervention could work for a subgroup but not for the masses. The study can be very rigorous (double blind, randomized, placebo
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Categories: Health Matters Blog.

A Modern Myth: Medicine as Science: Part II

I am waking to the fact that there is a long-term historical pattern of disinformation. Despite the periodic real advances in medicine over the centuries, facts demonstrate that the medical field dons the mask of science on a pretty regular basis. Here is a brief outline of some additional evidence: a) There are raging political-economic wars around Lyme disease, that have nothing to do with science. The Connecticut attorney General recently removed the mask of science from the IDSA (Infectious Disease Society of America), ordering this influential and prestigious group to reassess their guidelines for diagnosing and treating Lyme disease
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Categories: Health Matters Blog.

A Modern Myth: Medicine as Science

On January 17th, 2008, the prestigious New England Journal of Medicine, published a landmark paper by Eric Turner and others: “Selective Publication of Antidepressant Trials and Its Influence on Apparent Efficacy”. This paper showed that among 74 FDA registered studies of antidepressants, 31% were not published. 37 studies showing positive results were published, while studies showing negative or questionable results were, with three exceptions, either not published (22 studies) or published in a way that (the authors conclude) erroneously conveyed a positive outcome. This means that if one were to read the literature, one would believe that 94% of the
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Categories: Health Matters Blog.