Archives for Panic

Whole Psychiatrists’ Stalk Physical Causes of Mental Problems

The year was 1983. “A woman came to me with a panic disorder,” recalls Robert J. Hedaya, MD, a clinical associate professor of psychiatry at Georgetown Medical School in Washington. “She was 55, had one child about to go off to college. Her situation seemed pretty straightforward — probably separation anxiety… Read More
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Categories: Whole Psychiatry in the News.

A conversation between Jeffrey Zavik, CEO – Immuno Laboratories, and Robert J. Hedaya, M.D., D.F.A.P.A.,

Jeffrey Zavik: Dr. Hedaya is the director of the Hedaya Clinic and National Center for Whole Psychiatry based in Chevy Chase, Maryland and a clinical professor of psychiatry at the Georgetown University School of Medicine. I just finished looking at his nice website which is a very easy site to navigate and it is easy to find and remember. It is www.wholepsych.com. We recommend our readers and listeners to visit your site and get more information there as well. You are the author of at least three documents, I think more than that, but recently Depression, Advancing the Treatment Paradigm,
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Categories: Articles & White Papers, Interviews with Dr. Hedaya, and Whole Psychiatry in the News.

Panic Disorders: Part 2

Biological Theory of Panic Disorder (Recurrent Panic Attacks) The prevailing theory of panic disorder states that there are two types of panic attacks, non-phobic spontaneous panic and triggered panic attacks. Nonphobic panic attacks are thought to be the result of abnormal, over- sensitivity of a brain alarm system whose function is to detect early signs of suffocation. This theory is called the suffocation alarm theory. The cardinal symptoms of nonphobic panic are respiratory: shortness of breath, chest discomfort, palpitations and choking or suffocation sensations. Normally, carbon dioxide, the waste product of respiration, is exhaled from the lungs. In the event of
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Categories: Health Matters Blog.

Panic Disorders: Part 1

The Spectrum of Disorders Associated with Panic Panic attacks are among the most terrifying experiences a person can have. Panic disorders include panic with and without agoraphobia, simple phobia, posttraumatic stress disorder, and perhaps social phobias. The controversy over whether these disorders are closely related, and in what way is not addressed, since the research in this area is inconsistent and inconclusive. The focus here is on the current understanding of the biological underpinnings of the panic attack itself, as well as the psychosocial aspects of panic disorder. Diagnostic Considerations Symptoms of panic disorder, according to the DSM IV, include
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Categories: Health Matters Blog.

Can a Brain Be on Fire?

Yes! Over the last 20 years, ample evidence has accumulated to prove that inflammation in the body causes changes in the brain that lead to depression, anxiety, sleep problems, and memory problems. Inflammation comes from the Latin  ‘inflammare’ — to set on fire.  Our brain is ‘on fire’ when it is inflamed, or when our body is inflamed. What sets your brain on fire? Your body experiences inflammation the way your skin reacts to a cut:  The area becomes swollen, warmer, and it may hurt.  (This happens because there is increased blood flow, increased immune activity, and a change in
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Categories: Health Matters Blog.