Posts by Dr. Robert Hedaya

WSJ: "With Every Alzheimer’s Diagnosis the Same Bleak Conversation" & Dr. Hedaya’s Rebuttal

Jeremy Abbate writes in The Wall Street Journal With Every Alzheimer’s Diagnosis the Same Bleak Conversation Aug. 25, 2017 6:44 p.m. ET On an overcast Tuesday morning last October in Northford, Conn., I sat in a second-row pew in a quiet church and watched my father tell a heartwarming story about his older sister, Martha. He recalled an incident from his childhood when, as he recovered from a bike accident that injured his jaw, Martha had baked him a chocolate cake and lovingly cut it into tiny pieces so he could eat it through his stitched mouth. My father told
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Categories: Alzheimer's disease, Health Matters Blog, News, and Wall Street Journal.

Alzheimer’s Disease Letter to the Editor Wall Street Journal

Time for a Better Approach To Alzheimer’s Treatments Alzheimer’s research has failed because of adherence to a flawed model. April 16, 2017 12:32 p.m. ET As a psychopharmacologist who has worked with chronic illnesses such as dementia, neurodegenerative disorders and psychiatric disorders for more than 35 years, I can categorically say that the reason Alzheimer’s research has failed is adherence to a flawed model. Contrary to George Vradenburg and Howard Fillit’s contention, we will not cure or treat Alzheimer’s with drugs (“The FDA Can Declare War on Alzheimer’s,” op-ed, April 5). We will succeed when we focus on prevention of
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Categories: Alzheimer's disease, Health Matters Blog, News, and Wall Street Journal.

Control, Helplessness, Spirituality

I want to briefly address control, helplessness and spirituality. Depression is thought of as a state of ‘Learned Helplessness’ (Martin Seligman).  Generally speaking, we strive to have control over the things that we deem are essential to our self-esteem: power, achievement, money etc. When we perceive that we have lost hope of controlling these things—i.e., we are helpless in controlling them, most of us slide towards depression. The issue, which is not often addressed by professionals, is the fact that there is an embedded assumption here.  It is an assumption fostered by our culture and the psychological field.  The hidden
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Categories: Miscellaneous.

Dr. Hedaya Speaks at Georgetown University Wellness Conference

Achieving Optimal Wellness Conference at Georgetown University Doro Bush Koch, Patricia Reilly Koch and colleagues of the BB&R: a Lifestyle and Wellness Advisory firm hosted the Achieving Optimal Health Conference 2011 at Georgetown University “to inspire, motivate, and educate our attendees to create a healthier and more balanced life.” The program included presentations by Dr. Robert Hedaya, Dr. Richard Carmona, former Surgeon General and the president of president of the Canyon Ranch Institute; Dr. Michael Roizen, Chief Wellness Officer at the Cleveland Clinic and coauthor with Dr. Mehmet Oz of five number one New York Times bestsellers; and Dr. Bernie
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Categories: Health Matters Blog and The Center for Whole Psychiatry + Brain Recovery in the News.

Executive Vitality: Mind-Body Connection

We are believers in the mind-body connection. Each affects the other—no way around it. Therefore, we thought it would be useful to seek out some information from a specialist in holistic medicine. We sought advice from functional medicine doctor, Robert Hedaya, M.D., who takes a holistic physiological and psychosocial approach to health and mental health. We asked what, in his opinion, might be some controllable factors that could enhance your work performance. We thought you might be interested in what he had to say. According to Dr. Hedaya (www.wholepsychiatry.com), any or all of following action steps, if tried for two
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Categories: Articles & White Papers and Health Matters Blog.

Response to "The Angelina Effect"

“The Angelina Effect” [May 27] in Time Magazine details Angelina Jolie’s decision to have a double mastectomy. The May 27th cover story, “The Angelina Effect” was well done. However, what was not covered in the media generally, nor in the article, was the important fact that genetic testing may give false results. Both physicians and the public operate under the mistaken assumption that lab tests, and in particular genetic tests, are always accurate. In fact, they are not. This fact needs to find its way into the public debate around preventative mastectomies. I have been using genetic testing for more than
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Categories: Health Matters Blog.

DSM-V & Why Psychiatrists Need to Be Open to Other Fields

Talitha Stevenson’s Book Review in the Financial Times newspaper  (“Mind field”, Life & Arts, May 24) shed much need light on the release of the DSM V, and the ensuing national dialogue about psychiatry and its definitions of mental illness. As a Clinical Professor of Psychiatry, practitioner of The Center for Whole Psychiatry + Brain Recovery, and certified Psychopharmacologist, I propose a companion, if not an alternative to the DSM V. The authors of the DSM V have been searching for clear diagnostic labels to the point of absurdity. I suggest that we psychiatrists abandon this obsession with categorizing every aspect of
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Categories: Health Matters Blog and The Center for Whole Psychiatry + Brain Recovery in the News.

Health Perils of Sitting for Extended Periods

What we do all day with our bodies has consequences. Many of us sit during our working hours and leisure time and that directly affects our body chemistry. The New York Times article, Taking a Stand for Office Ergonomics, details some of the changes: “scientists have determined that after an hour or more of sittin, the production of enzymes that burn fat in the body declines as much as 90 percent. Extended sitting, they add, slows the body’s metabolism of glucose and lowers the level of good (HDL) cholesterol in the blood. Those are risk factors toward developing heart disease
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Categories: Health Matters Blog and Miscellaneous.

Useful News in Endocrinology: Things that Are Harmful to Your Thyroid Gland

Things that Are Harmful to Your Thyroid Gland CT Scans and Contrast Die First, a new study in the Archives of Internal Medicine (1) reveals that imaging studies which use Iodide as a contrast agent in CT scans and cardiac catheterizations increase the risk of over active thyroid (hyperthyroidism) by two to 2.5 times. The risk of severe low thyroid states (severe hypothyroidism) in increased 3-fold. Doctors and patients should take these risks into consideration when ordering these tests, as these tests use anywhere between 90 to several hundred-thousand times the recommended daily dose of iodine (150 micrograms). What to
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Categories: Health Matters Blog.